speed internet – Reservocation http://reservocation.com/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 05:27:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://reservocation.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T111851.286-150x150.png speed internet – Reservocation http://reservocation.com/ 32 32 Faster internet is on the way for 31,000 customers in downtown Ga https://reservocation.com/faster-internet-is-on-the-way-for-31000-customers-in-downtown-ga/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 04:35:00 +0000 https://reservocation.com/faster-internet-is-on-the-way-for-31000-customers-in-downtown-ga/ A government grant will help citizens in rural communities access the Internet. ROBERTA, Ga. — High-speed internet is on the way for even more central Georgians who can’t get it right now. 31,000 homes, businesses and institutions will now have broadband access in nine counties. “For businesses like City Hall, the computers bog down and […]]]>

A government grant will help citizens in rural communities access the Internet.

ROBERTA, Ga. — High-speed internet is on the way for even more central Georgians who can’t get it right now. 31,000 homes, businesses and institutions will now have broadband access in nine counties.

“For businesses like City Hall, the computers bog down and it’s hard to get good service,” Roberta Police Chief Ty Matthews said.

Slow internet is a common thing in central Georgia.

“We will find citizens who sit near the library at night to access the Internet,” Matthews said.

It’s what prompted the state to push for underserved and forgotten businesses, homes and institutions in nine central Georgia counties to create a 3,000-mile fiber optic network. Flint Energies and Connexon Connect make it happen.

“Flint Energies recently received a $25 million grant and we are very pleased as it will help us build this fiber backbone so that we can deliver internet to our customers and members faster and faster,” said Jennie Lacey of Flint Energies.

The American Rescue Plan grant fund made the $90 million project feasible. It should be finished in 2026.

Flint has already started building the fiber network for its current customers.

The nine counties mentioned in this week’s announcement are: Crawford, South Houston, Macon, Marion, Muscogee, Peach, Schley, Talbot and Taylor counties.

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Elon Musk activates free SpaceX Starlink satellite internet service in Ukraine https://reservocation.com/elon-musk-activates-free-spacex-starlink-satellite-internet-service-in-ukraine/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 21:39:00 +0000 https://reservocation.com/elon-musk-activates-free-spacex-starlink-satellite-internet-service-in-ukraine/ SpaceX founder and billionaire Elon Musk is providing free satellite internet service in Ukraine through his company Starlink, as Russia invades the country and causes blackouts. Starlink is a growing network of small satellites that SpaceX has been built since 2018 to provide high-speed Internet access worldwide. On Monday, Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister […]]]>

SpaceX founder and billionaire Elon Musk is providing free satellite internet service in Ukraine through his company Starlink, as Russia invades the country and causes blackouts.

Starlink is a growing network of small satellites that SpaceX has been built since 2018 to provide high-speed Internet access worldwide. On Monday, Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Digital Transformation Mykhailo Fedorov, tweeted that a truck full of Starlink terminals had arrived on Ukrainian soil, after he had requested them.

Fedorov had appealed to Musk in a Tweeter On Saturday, asking him to extend Starlink’s high-speed broadband internet services to the beleaguered country, noting rhetorically that “while you’re trying to colonize Mars – Russia is trying to occupy Ukraine! As your rockets land successfully from space – Russian rockets attack Ukrainian civilians!”

Musk apparently agreed, tweeting on Saturday that Starlink service was active in Ukraine and also agreeing to send more Starlink terminals to expand the country’s bandwidth.

“Starlink service is now active in Ukraine. More terminals on the way,” Musk said. tweeted.

Invading Russian troops disrupted Ukraine’s internet infrastructure, rendering service unreliable and spotty in some parts of the country.

Starlink service, which its website describes as “ideal for rural and remote communities” and other places where internet connections have historically been unavailable, is expected to be more reliable than terrestrial systems that are currently down.

A Starlink terminal costs $499. The system was recently used to restore communications to remote villages in Tonga after a volcanic eruption triggered a tsunamicutting off internet service.

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Does a VPN help with internet speed? [Fastest VPNs 2022] https://reservocation.com/does-a-vpn-help-with-internet-speed-fastest-vpns-2022/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 14:51:45 +0000 https://reservocation.com/does-a-vpn-help-with-internet-speed-fastest-vpns-2022/ In some cases, ISP-specific issues can slow down your connection. If this happens to you, hiding the type of traffic you are sending can work around these issues. So, does a VPN help with internet speed? Generally, no, but there are some notable exceptions. Key points to remember: In most cases, you will notice a […]]]>

In some cases, ISP-specific issues can slow down your connection. If this happens to you, hiding the type of traffic you are sending can work around these issues. So, does a VPN help with internet speed? Generally, no, but there are some notable exceptions.

Key points to remember:

  • In most cases, you will notice a slight drop in your internet connection speed when you connect to a VPN.
  • If your ISP throttles certain types of traffic or has poor peering with other networks, the reverse may be true.
  • If your VPN drastically reduces your bandwidth, try changing servers and protocols before considering a provider with faster VPN speeds.

In this article, we’ll cover instances where VPN connection speeds might exceed normal internet connection speeds. Beyond that, we’ll look at the far more common scenario of slow VPN connection speeds and how you could improve them.

  • Yes, VPNs will generally slow down your internet speed at least somewhat. However, unless your internet connection is very slow initially, the effect usually won’t be too noticeable. There are also rare cases where a VPN can actually improve your connection speed.

  • The fastest VPNs we’ve tested at Cloudwards are ExpressVPN, Surfshark, StrongVPN, and ProtonVPN.

How Does a VPN Help With Internet Speed?

Most of the time, you won’t get a speed boost from using a VPN. This is because a VPN cannot actually increase the amount of bandwidth you have beyond what your connection is capable of. That said, there are a few exceptions to this.

ISP throttling

The main one you might encounter is ISP throttling. In jurisdictions with poor net neutrality legislation, ISPs may decide to throttle certain types of internet traffic (usually things like peer-to-peer downloads or high-definition streaming) in order to limit the amount of bandwidth bandwidth you can use.

limited internet activity slow internet connection speed

Torrenting is one of the most commonly throttled forms of internet traffic.

If your ISP does this, a VPN can mask the type of traffic you’re sending, making selective throttling impossible.

Peering agreements

Another case where a VPN can improve the speed of your internet traffic is if your ISP has bad peering agreements with other networks. We won’t go into too much detail on this, but essentially a peering agreement is a contract between two networks to cooperate and transfer each other’s traffic. If your ISP doesn’t have many, it can hurt your internet speed.

A VPN gets around this problem by hiding the origin of your data, which means other networks can’t tell it’s coming from a network with poorly configured or poorly negotiated peering agreements.

Why Do VPNs Slow Your Internet Connection?

Other than the exceptions mentioned above, using a VPN to access the internet will generally result in increased latency and slower speeds. This is because using a VPN adds a step between you and the website or server you are trying to access.

How to see if your VPN is slowing down your internet speed

Determining if your VPN is slowing you down is simple. First, connect to VPN, go to speedtest.net and run the test. Write down the result when it’s finished, then disconnect from the VPN and run the test again. This should give you a pretty good idea of ​​the speed difference, but if you want as accurate a picture as possible, you can run a few tests and average the results.

test vpn connection speed limits

The only way to determine the impact of a VPN on your speed is to run a speed test with and without a connection and compare the results.

How to speed up your virtual private network connection

If your VPN is slowing you down, there are a few things you can try to improve your speed. The first and easiest is to simply connect to another VPN server. Things like server load and physical distance can dramatically alter the speed you get, so be sure to try a few different ones.

test several vpn protocols and servers

When troubleshooting, first try another server based in the same location before switching to another server location entirely.

If that doesn’t help, you can also try changing the VPN protocol. Most VPNs will default to OpenVPN, which should be fine, but it’s worth trying a few others like WireGuard or IKEv2 to see if your speed improves.

Finally, not all VPNs are created equal. If your VPN is slowing you down, no matter what server and protocol you’re using, you might want to consider switching to a faster VPN.

Final Thoughts

Ultimately, the slight decrease in internet speeds caused by most VPN providers is usually outweighed by all the security features and access to geo-restricted content you get by using a VPN connection. On top of that, there are even instances where a VPN can give you faster speeds.

If you think this might be the case for you, we recommend checking out our lists of the best VPNs to find a VPN provider that gives you the most bang for your buck while potentially improving your bandwidth.

What do you think of our explanation of why a VPN could potentially provide faster internet speeds and our troubleshooting tips for VPN speed issues? Have you encountered throttling from your ISP or poor peering? Let us know in the comments below. Thanks for the reading.

Let us know if you liked the post. This is the only way to improve ourselves.



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Lumbee Tribal Council Allows Internet Service Providers on Tribal Lands https://reservocation.com/lumbee-tribal-council-allows-internet-service-providers-on-tribal-lands/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 01:35:30 +0000 https://reservocation.com/lumbee-tribal-council-allows-internet-service-providers-on-tribal-lands/ PEMBROKE — The Lumbee Tribal Council on Thursday gave the green light to two internet service providers to provide high-speed service along tribal lands. Council unanimously approved a resolution of consent and support for the Atlantic Telephone Membership Corporation (Focus Broadband) and Charter Communications (Spectrum) to build and provide high-speed Internet access in areas designated […]]]>

PEMBROKE — The Lumbee Tribal Council on Thursday gave the green light to two internet service providers to provide high-speed service along tribal lands.

Council unanimously approved a resolution of consent and support for the Atlantic Telephone Membership Corporation (Focus Broadband) and Charter Communications (Spectrum) to build and provide high-speed Internet access in areas designated as Tribal Territory Lands Lumbee through Robeson, Hoke, Scotland and Cumberland. counties.

The council also approved the construction of a network for the proliferation of high-speed internet service in the public right-of-way of Lumbee lands and offered support to the two providers to obtain subsidies to achieve the goal.

“A significant number of homes and businesses currently do not have access to fast and reliable high-speed internet…this lack of high-speed internet access has placed our tribe at a significant disadvantage, and in particular our students and children. “, read Gerald. Goolsby, chairman of the Economic Development Committee, orders.

Councilor Richard Jones told council members that this is good news for the Lumbee Tribe.

“It should set a precedent for any company that wants to do business with the Lumbee Tribe, with the Lumbee Tribe, which would create land recognition. I think it’s really a happy day for the tribe,” Jones said.

In financial matters, the board approved the first amendment to the current year’s budget to include more than $5 million in funds remaining from the prior year’s budget. The funds will be used to augment the Housing Replacement, Property Maintenance, Dreamcatcher Communities and Vehicle Maintenance line items of the current fiscal year 2021-22 budget, said Pam Hunt, Chair of the Lumbee Finance Committee. TribalCouncil.

The biggest increase will be the Dream Catcher item. An additional $3,693,452.83 will be budgeted, bringing the new total to $4,866,298.83.

An additional $180,000 was added to the house replacement element, bringing the new total to $680,000; $600,000 was added to homeownership maintenance, bringing the new total to $1,125,000; and the vehicle maintenance budget has been doubled and now totals $100,000.

Report and ethical decisions

No sanctions will be imposed on three complaints filed with the ethics committee, Dewey McNeill, chair of the committee, said in a report.

A lawsuit was filed against Joshua Malcolm, who was a Lumbee Tribe Supreme Court Justice, by Ron Oxendine. McNeill said the case was thrown out because the council lacked the power to go to the tribe’s supreme court.

Two complaints about a conflict of interest involving council members Marshirl Lockler and Wendy Moore were also dismissed. Locklear’s dismal complaint came after a review determined there was no conflict. Moore’s case was dismissed because she requested the recusal on the case via email before the case was discussed.

Community Feedback

During the community feedback portion of the meeting, former Lumbee Tribal Council Chair Anita Blanks called on council members to create an order requiring answers from the Lumbee Tribe Supreme Court.

“I’d like to know when you’re all going to set parameters for our Supreme Court in terms of hearing cases,” Blanks said. “If they don’t respond to the complainant, let them (those filing the complaint) know that they won’t hear it and why they won’t. This kind of things.

Blanks said she personally submitted several cases to the Supreme Court that received no response.

“No we’re not gonna hear it, we’re not gonna hear it, kiss my foot, nothing and I’ve acquired multiple times,” Blanks said. “Currently they just don’t hear, don’t respond to cases.”

Blanks said when she was on the board, an ordinance was proposed to address the issue.

“It unfortunately didn’t come out of the committee, but I hope you all do better than us.”

Tomeka Sinclair can be reached at [email protected] or 910-416-5865.

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County reminds people of federal internet discount program https://reservocation.com/county-reminds-people-of-federal-internet-discount-program/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 17:28:08 +0000 https://reservocation.com/county-reminds-people-of-federal-internet-discount-program/ [ad_1] Conaughton Concert San Diego County Communications Office The county is reminding the public of the Dec. 31 deadline for low-income residents and families to apply for discounted high-speed internet service through the Federal Communications Commission. Eligible residents and families who apply by December 31 can receive Federal Communications Commission broadband internet discounts through March […]]]>


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Conaughton Concert

San Diego County Communications Office

The county is reminding the public of the Dec. 31 deadline for low-income residents and families to apply for discounted high-speed internet service through the Federal Communications Commission.

Eligible residents and families who apply by December 31 can receive Federal Communications Commission broadband internet discounts through March 2022 through local providers – up to $ 50 per month for households and $ 75 per month on eligible tribal lands.

The FCC created its Emergency Broadband Service Rebate Program During the COVID-19 Pandemic to help eligible residents and families connect or stay connected to high-speed internet service. The program is replaced in March 2022 by a new FAC rebate program.

For general program information and links to relevant websites, be sure to go to the FCC Broadband Emergency Benefits website, https://www.fcc.gov/broadbandbenefit. FCC officials have warned the public that a fraudulent website is falsely offering to enroll in the program to collect information about people.

How to register

Registration is a two-step process.

1. First, go to GetEmergencyBroadband.org to print an application by mail or submit an application online.

2. Contact your preferred participating provider to select an eligible plan and apply the discount to your bill.

Note: Eligible households must apply for the program and contact a participating provider to select a high speed Internet program.

Who is eligible?

A household is eligible if a household member meets one of the following criteria:

● Has an income equal to or less than 135% of federal poverty guidelines, or who participates in certain assistance programs, such as SNAP (Supplementary Nutritional Assistance Program), Medicaid or Lifeline, the Lifeline Support for Affordable program FCC Communications

● Is approved to receive benefits under the Free and Discounted School Lunch Program or the School Breakfast Program, including through the USDA Community Eligibility Provision during the year school 2019-2020, 2020-2021 or 2021-2022

● Received a Federal Pell Grant in the current award year

● Has experienced a substantial loss of income due to job loss or leave since February 29, 2020 and the household had a total income in 2020 equal to or less than $ 99,000 for single filers and 198,000 $ for joint filers; Where

● Meets the eligibility criteria of a participating provider’s existing low-income or COVID-19 program.

It is important for the County to ensure that all residents of San Diegan have access to high speed internet. The county is a member of the San Diego Government Association’s Regional Digital Divide Task Force and is working on a plan to develop broader high-speed internet infrastructure in unincorporated areas. County supervisors also voted unanimously in May to commit up to $ 1.4 million to a SANDAG / Caltrans project to extend fiber-optic cable along National Highway 67.

For more information on the program, visit https://www.fcc.gov/broadbandbenefit.

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Future of American agriculture demands high-speed internet solutions https://reservocation.com/future-of-american-agriculture-demands-high-speed-internet-solutions/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 03:27:45 +0000 https://reservocation.com/future-of-american-agriculture-demands-high-speed-internet-solutions/ [ad_1] ST. LOUIS – A new report, funded by the United Soybean Board and produced by the Benton Institute for Broadband & Society, has found that providing American farmers and ranchers with fast, affordable and reliable broadband access will increase sustainability. It will also enable more reliable and efficient food production for a growing population […]]]>


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ST. LOUIS – A new report, funded by the United Soybean Board and produced by the Benton Institute for Broadband & Society, has found that providing American farmers and ranchers with fast, affordable and reliable broadband access will increase sustainability. It will also enable more reliable and efficient food production for a growing population and strengthen rural American communities.

“Data is the most valuable tool in our farm’s toolbox. Without a reliable connection to the Internet, data collection and further use is severely limited, ”said Meagan Kaiser, USB treasurer, soil scientist, and Missouri farmer. “The data gives us the ability to identify the nutrient needs of plants and target those nutrients only where they are needed, leading to increased yields without expanding the acreage. It all starts with connectivity.

Interviews with farmers, rural internet service providers, equipment manufacturers, and agricultural leaders and experts revealed consensus around several key outcomes for rural broadband, such as the need for robust download speeds, accurate network deployment data and scalable technologies.

The report, The Future of American Farming: Broadband Solutions for the Farm Office, Field and Community, presents 15 concrete recommendations for delivering the high-speed internet that farmers and rural communities need.

Categorized by farm center, wireless needs in the field, and the reliability of broadband that can support the interdependent relationship between farmers and their rural communities, some of the concrete recommendations include:

• Establish performance standards that stand the test of time: To meet the growing demand of farmers for upstream and downstream speeds, networks must be able to provide 100/100 Mbps service.

• Adopt high-performance standards: Performance standards for download speeds and latency are expected to reflect farmers’ changing needs for precision farming.

• Encourage deep fiber buildup: Fiber construction in rural America, even if not directly on the farm, will be required to support capable wireless connections for higher bandwidth applications in the field.

• Filling the gaps in the mapping of agricultural land: Broadband maps should include mobile coverage on farmland. The underlying data that informs these maps must be publicly available.

• Support digital equity programs at state and local levels: Digital equity programs can work with communities to help people make full use of broadband connections.

“For many farmers, sustainability integrates the economic, environmental and social impacts of agriculture – a triple bottom line,” said Jordan Arnold, associate researcher at the Benton Institute for Broadband & Society and author of the report. “Now is the time to deploy the broadband networks and the adoption strategies they need. “

The recommendations are a direct response to problems revealed in a 2019 rural broadband study from USB. This initial study showed that 60% of American farmers and ranchers do not believe they have adequate internet connectivity to run their businesses and that plans to integrate data into everyday decisions are often thwarted by internet speeds. slow, high costs and unreliable service. The study also noted that many farmers have no other viable option to switch Internet service providers.

Even embarrassed by these issues, farmers know that broadband is a necessary tool to implement innovative agricultural practices and allow a more targeted and more efficient use of resources. Broadband access allows farmers to measure their inputs and outputs more efficiently, which creates smarter and more sustainable resource management.

“The connectivity of land, equipment and infrastructure allows for the proactive management of digital data at the farm and ranch level. Digital data management drives precision farming, and precision farming drives many fundamental aspects of measurable sustainability, ”said Mace Thornton, vice president of communications and marketing strategy for USB. “This is why this issue is so vital for soybeans.”

To read the full report, visit tinyurl.com/2tzdm5ap.

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Life without a reliable internet remains a daily struggle for millions of Americans https://reservocation.com/life-without-a-reliable-internet-remains-a-daily-struggle-for-millions-of-americans/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 11:00:36 +0000 https://reservocation.com/life-without-a-reliable-internet-remains-a-daily-struggle-for-millions-of-americans/ [ad_1] Three days and an hour after the start of the 2021-22 school year, the internet shut down at the Owhyhee Combined School in northern Nevada. Teachers rushed to recreate their lesson plans and presentations, and were unable to register attendance. “We have no way of ensuring that students are in the right classes at […]]]>


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Three days and an hour after the start of the 2021-22 school year, the internet shut down at the Owhyhee Combined School in northern Nevada.

Teachers rushed to recreate their lesson plans and presentations, and were unable to register attendance.

“We have no way of ensuring that students are in the right classes at the right time,” said Lynn Manning-John, vice principal of K-12 school.

“We had a student showing symptoms of COVID this morning, so finding this student’s data in order to reach his family is also something we can’t do because we don’t have the internet.”

The face-to-face classes had just resumed after a year of mainly distance learning. But for Owyhee’s students, instructors, and administrators, this was not an entirely new problem. The community has never had reliable high speed internet access.

Before the pandemic, they could just wait for connectivity to return, Manning-John said. But school materials and systems have been moved online to enable distance learning. And internet problems also affected the last year of online school – many students were unable to log into their classes from home.

The town of Owyhee is about 100 miles from the nearest towns with services, requiring a 1.5 hour road trip to do groceries, for example. It is located on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation, home to the Shoshone-Paiute tribes, in northern Nevada and southern Idaho.

Manning-John said their remote location has made it difficult for them to get online for years.

“We want fiber, we want 5G, we want the latest technology, but we’re so isolated, it’s a challenge for [telecommunications companies] to get their employees to come here, ”she said.

The reservation has only one cell phone tower and one wired Internet provider, according to Mary Howard, the reservation’s computer systems administrator. But that internet connection is slow and unreliable, and Manning-John said it doesn’t even reach his house. She and her five children use their phone’s hotspots to connect to the Internet at home.

This has made working and studying from home a challenge over the past year and a half. Other Owyhee students faced an even greater challenge, Manning-John said.

“[My kids], their mom works at school. Their mother can afford the Internet. Their mother could afford to have a phone with personal hotspot service included in our plan, “she said.” We are the exception.

Broadband and the digital divide

The pandemic has laid bare the importance of having a high-speed internet connection, as many Americans have been forced to live their lives online. Yet tens of millions of people across the country, especially in rural areas and tribal lands, lack the kind of fast or reliable connection they need for things like work, school and telehealth.

President Biden’s recently signed $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill aims to alleviate the problem by setting aside $ 65 billion for broadband investments. Its largest allocations would give states $ 42.5 billion to fund broadband infrastructure, as well as $ 14.25 billion in subsidies to help low-income households access the Internet.

Lawmakers consulted with Kathryn de Wit, project manager for the Pew Charitable Trusts Broadband Access Initiative, and her team when drafting the legislation. She said the plan was a “big down payment” for connecting underserved households – in part because it also relied on the Federal Communications Commission to better determine exactly who did not have high-speed Internet access.

The FCC estimated that 14.5 million people in the United States lived in areas without broadband access at the end of 2019, while data aggregation company BroadbandNow estimated that number at 42 million. The White House says 30 million.

In 2020, separate legislation asked the FCC to update its broadband access cards. Tired of waiting for these updates, some states already have deployed their own methods to track broadband access. The new legislation requires the FCC to complete its map updates by making funding conditional on the submission of those updates – and also stipulates a process by which states can dispute the FCC maps with their own.

Then there are questions about what really constitutes high internet speeds. The FCC defines broadband as an Internet connection with minimum speeds of 25 megabits per second for download and 3 Mbps for download. De Wit notes that these minimum speeds may be insufficient for the level of demand observed during the pandemic.

“What is it [means] is that a person in the household can access the internet, make purchases, just surf the web, send emails with limited interference, ”said de Wit.“ As soon as you have more users who are on this connection, which perform more complex tasks such as, for example, , connect with doctors, talk or participate in education, the quality of that connection will deteriorate, ”she said.

De Wit further points out that the FCC’s tally is based on the number of households that have access to a broadband connection with the maximum speeds. announcement by providers – not the actual speeds they receive.

The infrastructure bill would not change the 25/3 definition of broadband, but would require grant recipients to provide a minimum service of 100 Mbps download and 20 Mbps download.

What is clear even with uneven data available is that most of the people without broadband access live in rural, remote, low-income and tribal lands. Low population density and geographic barriers may discourage a service provider from offering services in this region.

“It’s important to remember that we are talking about a for-profit industry,” said de Wit. “So when we look at communities that are not densely populated, perhaps where income levels are lower, where providers don’t see a clear business case, then it is up to the public sector to identify the opportunities to encourage investment in these communities. “

In places where broadband is available, some households may not be able to afford the services. A Pew Inquiry conducted earlier this year found that 45% of respondents who did not have broadband cited the monthly cost as a reason for not having it.

De Wit said the new FCC data would not only help understand where broadband access is needed most, but also illustrate where there may be a connection available, but not affordable.

“The digital divide is really complicated, and so where we would like to see additional support is for state and local leaders to collect the data they need to illustrate the number of unserved households in communities. which are ‘served’ on the federal database, ”she said.

Waiting for a solution in the Duck Valley

The infrastructure bill establishes $ 2 billion in funding specifically for tribal communities – Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Hawaiian Natives. This gives Manning-John reassurance that the tribal areas will not be fighting against states and municipalities for federal money.

In the meantime, she only updates her phone when she’s staying in an out-of-town hotel and can connect to Wi-Fi for a few hours. She sees parents parking near the school to connect to the internet when the school switches to online learning to limit the spread of the virus. She sees her Grade 11 daughter taking online classes powered by a cellphone hotspot – and she longs for a day without so many connection issues.

Next, she looks at the land in the Duck Valley Reservation and remembers why she chose to stay.

“We need to remember, once again, as we go through some of the 21st century’s most Internet-less problems, that our ancestors put us in the right place so that when it all stops, we still have our beautiful land and everything we need to survive, ”she said.

Still, she acknowledges that surviving the modern era – especially during a pandemic – is nearly impossible on the reserve without high-speed internet.

“Our isolation has historically allowed us to preserve our language, our culture and our traditions, and that has served us well,” she said. “However, this is of no use to us in the age of the Internet where we need up-to-date, late-breaking information; we need to be able to disseminate information and instructions.”

This story is part of our All things Considered series on the President’s recently signed infrastructure bill. Alejandra Marquez Janse and Amy Isackson produced this story for broadcast. Patrick Jarenwattananon contributed to its adaptation to the web.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Competition with Starlink: Stratosphere pilots should bring internet access https://reservocation.com/competition-with-starlink-stratosphere-pilots-should-bring-internet-access/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 20:20:40 +0000 https://reservocation.com/competition-with-starlink-stratosphere-pilots-should-bring-internet-access/ [ad_1] Mobile balloon or plane stations in the stratosphere have so far been an unrealized dream. It wasn’t until the beginning of the year that Internet giant Alphabet ended its Moonshot Loon project due to a lack of profit prospects, which wanted to bring the Internet to the poor masses in developing countries. with balloons […]]]>


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Mobile balloon or plane stations in the stratosphere have so far been an unrealized dream. It wasn’t until the beginning of the year that Internet giant Alphabet ended its Moonshot Loon project due to a lack of profit prospects, which wanted to bring the Internet to the poor masses in developing countries. with balloons in arrow. However, the global consortium for this “High Altitude Platform Station” (HAPS), to which Airbus and Deutsche Telekom also belong, do not give up: the first summit of the HAPS alliance took place on Monday to give more impetus to the idea that was coming down.

Airborne commercial services for the internet could take off in 2027, said Ryuji Wakikawa, vice president of Japanese mobile operator Softbank Corp. Global technology investor Softbank’s Japanese mobile network is sticking to the idea and just acquired Loon’s patents. Wakikawa was therefore optimistic: “The challenge is not technology, but national rules and market acceptance.

Japan has always tried everything possible with electronics Рand often the impossible. Every Thursday, our author Martin K̦lling reports here the latest trends from Tokyo.

  • More articles on “Japan Post”

For Wakikawa, the global telecommunications industry is facing a paradigm shift. The network’s strategy is shifting “from covering as much of the population as possible to the entire territory,” explained the Softbanks employee for in-house HAPS Mobile. And its raison d’être is the “Internet of Things”.

The new 5G networks will not only connect more people, but also machines, measuring stations and sensors, argued Wakikawa – and this also in remote areas that were previously not covered due to a lack of people. For this reason, various companies have been competing for years with ideas to allow Internet access without land base stations in all corners of the world.

The HAPS alliance is one of the comrades in arms. Suppliers want solar-powered balloons, airships or light planes with a large wingspan to rise 20 kilometers high into the stratosphere, where flying base stations can spin for months. However, the idea is in competition with satellite Internet, which enjoys significant support.

None other than Tesla founder Elon Musk and his space company SpaceX are already distributing satellites for his Starlink project in near-Earth orbits. Not before October Musk tweetedthat customers would not have to do without high-speed internet services on planes via its full network. Softbank is also banking on base stations in space with an investment in the start-up OneWeb.

But for Wakikawa, HAPS remains an alternative to expensive satellite Internet. Aspects are the lower start-up costs for stratosphere pilots, another is the lower delay in data transfer. With satellites, the so-called latency is 20 to 500 milliseconds, with a HAPS network only 0.3 milliseconds, he announces. He also argues that satellite and stratospheric Internet should not be seen as competition, but as two technologies that complement each other.

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But despite all the enthusiasm, the digital conference also showed that until now a viable business model for the HAPS network was missing. The costs are still too high to fulfill the social mission of giving access to the Internet to the poorest in the most remote regions of the world.

An important requirement of the online conference was therefore the complete automation of the floating base stations. “We need an autonomous fleet management system,” said Andy Thurling, chair of the HAPS Alliance Aviation Working Group. But he’s also confident. The task force spent 2020 defining its goal. “Now we are in the operating mode. “


(jle)

Disclaimer: This article is generated from the feed and not edited by our team.


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Arizona releases $ 100 million for broadband Internet expansion https://reservocation.com/arizona-releases-100-million-for-broadband-internet-expansion/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 21:08:19 +0000 https://reservocation.com/arizona-releases-100-million-for-broadband-internet-expansion/ [ad_1] Arizona organizations looking to expand broadband Internet access in their communities can now apply for funding from a $ 100 million tranche of the US bailout. The federal stimulus package passed by Congress and enacted by President Joe Biden in March prioritized the expansion of broadband internet after the COVID-19 pandemic displaced work, appointments […]]]>


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Arizona organizations looking to expand broadband Internet access in their communities can now apply for funding from a $ 100 million tranche of the US bailout.

The federal stimulus package passed by Congress and enacted by President Joe Biden in March prioritized the expansion of broadband internet after the COVID-19 pandemic displaced work, appointments at doctors and the online school, highlighting gaps in access.

On Monday, Gov. Doug Ducey’s office announced that the state will begin receiving applications for grants to improve Internet access for Arizona residents through the Arizona Broadband Development Grants program.

“These investments will be a game-changer for our state, accelerating economic growth and improving the lives of thousands of people who do not have access to a reliable Internet,” said Sandra Watson, president and CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority, in a press release.

Disparate access

Federal Communications Commission and Microsoft studies have revealed disparate high-speed internet access in Grand Canyon State, rural counties with significantly lower utilization rates. Advocates say physical access and the ability to afford the relatively high cost of broadband continue to create barriers for households hoping to connect.

In addition to grants from Arizona, more money is on its way to bridge the so-called digital divide. Lawmakers in Washington, DC, included $ 65 billion for broadband in sweeping $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure spending plan Biden signed on Monday.

The Arizona Broadband Development Grants program aims to fund the “construction, installation or improvement of broadband infrastructure,” according to the state’s application portal, in the goal of improving access “for the citizens, businesses, health care, public and educational institutions of Arizona. sectors.”

Who can ask for money?

Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. on December 10. Tribes, local governments, Internet service providers, nonprofits, and school districts are eligible.

Although Ducey previously linked eligibility for federal stimulus funding to COVID-related protocols, resulting in a reprimand from federal officials, there are no similar restrictions on this funding, according to Keith Watkins, Arizona Commerce Authority senior vice president of rural development.

The money is available to applicants across the state, but the grants recognize the challenges of providing the internet in rural areas, Watkins said.

Projects in Maricopa and Pima counties are eligible for grants of up to $ 5 million. In rural areas, the grant ceiling is $ 10 million per project. Rural areas include Apache, Cochise, Coconino, Gila, Graham, Greenlee, La Paz, Mohave, Navajo, Pinal, Santa Cruz, Yavapai and Yuma counties.

“It’s much more expensive to deploy infrastructure in rural areas,” Watkins said. “In the geographic landscape that we have – the hills, the mountains and the rocks – it is about breaking down the cost barriers for the end consumer.”

Those with internet access can find more information and apply for the grant at www.azcommerce.com/broadband/grant-opportunities. You can also call the Arizona Commerce Authority at 602-845-1245.

Contact journalist Stacey Barchenger at stacey.barchenger@arizonarepublic.com or 480-416-5669. Follow her on Twitter @sbarchenger.

Support local journalism. Subscribe to azcentral.com today.


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Residents without a telephone, Internet service ask the commissioners for answers https://reservocation.com/residents-without-a-telephone-internet-service-ask-the-commissioners-for-answers/ https://reservocation.com/residents-without-a-telephone-internet-service-ask-the-commissioners-for-answers/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 21:24:56 +0000 https://reservocation.com/residents-without-a-telephone-internet-service-ask-the-commissioners-for-answers/ [ad_1] While a lack of high-speed internet access is not unusual for Cowetans who live in the more rural areas of the county, some Cowetans cannot even get reliable phone service. Two Cowetans recently spoke to the Coweta County Council of Commissioners about their problems with not being able to get not only internet service […]]]>


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While a lack of high-speed internet access is not unusual for Cowetans who live in the more rural areas of the county, some Cowetans cannot even get reliable phone service.

Two Cowetans recently spoke to the Coweta County Council of Commissioners about their problems with not being able to get not only internet service but also landline service. Residents of Martin Girls Road and Hewlett South Road said they couldn’t even call 911 in an emergency.

Coweta County has been urged to use part of its American Rescue Plan Act funds for “last mile” broadband service, which would help customers in rural areas or those with long driveways who otherwise would have to. pay several thousand dollars to get the service. .

The county also has an agreement in principle with an Internet service provider that will solicit ARPA funds through the state for “last mile and long driveway connections” for a specific number of customers.

The lack of broadband in rural areas is a big problem. Hall County recently announced that it will partner with AT&T to apply for a $ 21.3 million grant to provide high-speed fiber-optic service to 13,000 people in the county, according to the Gainesville Times.

The proposed Hall County project would include a contribution of $ 12.76 million from AT&T and $ 6.62 million from the county.

As for Coweta’s proposal, Coweta County Administrator Michael Fouts said he received a draft deal with an ISP this week.

“This is a priority for the board and the staff,” he said. “We will work to have the deal finalized for review by the board in the coming weeks.”

No phone or way to call for help

D’Antoinette Atkinson lives in a new house on Martin Girl Road. She said she spoke to Charter who told her she could get service for $ 8,000.

She said her cell phone service was spotty and she wanted to get a landline. There is an AT&T box nearby, but all ports are in use and the company doesn’t want to upgrade.

“It leaves me without access to the public service. It’s a matter of security,” she said. A few weeks ago, she said her father tried to call her several times to let her know there was a manhunt in the area, but he couldn’t get through. “It’s dangerous,” she said.

Atkinson said she is an essential worker and works from home, but her job does not allow her to use satellite internet for security reasons.

“I am basically asking the county to help me do this because it hinders my right to work,” she said.

ARPA funds can be used for several different purposes, including expanding infrastructure and for essential workers, and Atkinson said she was an essential worker.

She said she had been trying to get service since before moving in.

“I’m here tonight to ask you to help us. I don’t want to wait until my daughter, myself or any of my elderly neighbors are found dead because we can’t get the help we need. because we can’t call anyone. ”

A great need in the community

Commissioner Al Smith asked at the meeting if the county has funds to help residents resolve this issue.

Fouts said the county has no program in place to help individual homeowners, but said the county receives similar requests once or twice a month. “We are trying to help,” he said.

“There is a much larger need in the community,” Fouts said. He said he spoke with Atkinson.

“We spend a tremendous amount of time on land and property, but our ultimate goal here is to help people, not necessarily things,” Smith said. “We have to make ways, we’re supposed to find a way to help someone.”

Commissioner Tim Lassetter said Fouts had been diligent in contacting Charter. He had a constituent who was told it would cost $ 20,000.

“Unfortunately, the number of suppliers is limited,” Lassetter said. And after a law change a few years ago, “we have less leverage, I guess you could say, with these providers.”

A Cowetan reported that Charter told them they would not be able to provide the service even if they paid thousands of dollars to have the lines run to their homes.

Lassetter said there are so many areas with the same problem in the county, and it’s frustrating not being able to help. With the request from ARPA, “maybe then we can have the flexibility to help individuals,” Lassetter said.

Smith said the staff have the ability to put a plan in place. “If there is a way… then that’s what the taxpayers put us in power for.”

“I want us to use all the power at our discretion to try to talk to Charter, find a way,” Smith said. “It is something that is necessary, and I dare say that it is deserved.

“If we can’t do it, we can’t. But we have to do our best.”

Commissioner Paul Poole said he was surprised Atkinson couldn’t even get a landline.

What can be done?

Jeaneane Camp, who lives on Hewlett South Road, also spoke up and said this is a much bigger problem than single-family homes. She and her husband renovated an old house that had a landline, but when they tried to turn on phone service, they were told no.

“We had a line, we had a connection and AT&T said, ‘We won’t be working on this, but we’re happy to provide you with the internet,’ Camp said. ‘I said,’ Fine, we’ll take the internet. . ”

But then the agent realized that they couldn’t provide the internet either, and said she could refer her to a satellite company.

Camp said she knew AT&T operated a fiber optic line that ran through their property several years ago. “They said, ‘No, I’m sorry we can’t do this,” she said.

“We are not looking for any phone service,” Camp said.

The AT&T box is at a nearby intersection and there appears to be a technician on duty several hours a week, she said.

“I believe it is a bigger problem,” she said. “I think what we are asking today is to commission a study” to see who has and does not have service and what it might look like to get service for everyone.

“We think there is room in some COVID relief fund for this type of issue – connectivity. COVID has proven to us that connectivity is no longer a necessity that we love for the city dwellers or the wealthy. C t is a question of safety, it is a question of people able to work, it is a question of children being able to go to school when we have to stay at home.

“I don’t think it’s more of a ‘nice to have’. I think it’s become a requirement,” she said. “We have internet connectivity in this county; it’s about s ‘ensure that everyone has internet connectivity in this county, not just in some areas, ”she said.

She would like to see a study to “really get to the bottom of what can be done here”.

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