internet access – Reservocation http://reservocation.com/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 05:27:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://reservocation.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T111851.286-150x150.png internet access – Reservocation http://reservocation.com/ 32 32 Google’s undersea internet cable will connect Togo to Europe https://reservocation.com/googles-undersea-internet-cable-will-connect-togo-to-europe/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 22:56:08 +0000 https://reservocation.com/googles-undersea-internet-cable-will-connect-togo-to-europe/ The first leg of Google’s Equiano undersea internet cable – which will run from Cape Town, South Africa, to Lisbon, Portugal – has landed in Lomé, Togo, the company said on Friday. The massive fiber optic cable will be Google’s first to link Africa with Europe and is expected to bring internet connectivity to millions […]]]>

The first leg of Google’s Equiano undersea internet cable – which will run from Cape Town, South Africa, to Lisbon, Portugal – has landed in Lomé, Togo, the company said on Friday. The massive fiber optic cable will be Google’s first to link Africa with Europe and is expected to bring internet connectivity to millions of people on both continents. This will have a particular impact in Togo, where an estimated 74% of the population does not have internet access. The cable should provide 20 times more Internet capacity in the region.

Google began investing heavily in undersea cable internet nearly a decade ago, with its first condominium cable project, Unity (which stretches from Chikura, Japan to Redondo Beach, Calif. ) commissioned in 2010. The company invested, either alone or as part of a consortium — a total of . Its latest completed project, Dunant, entered service in January 2021 and stretches from Virginia Beach to the French coast.

Alphabet is far from the only tech giant investing heavily in , which has become more ubiquitous with the growth of mobile internet. Google, along with Meta, Microsoft and Amazon, now dominate the world’s critical wired infrastructure, while the the wall street journal . Last month, Meta announced plans to build at least two by 2027.

Submarine cables have a notable drawback: the cables can tear and , either due to natural disasters or human activities like . Cable breaks occur particularly along African coastlines and can leave entire regions without connectivity for . Last year, a massive landslide in South Africa caused two submarine cables to crash, leading to service interruptions and slowdowns across the continent. But in the event of a break, a nearby submarine cable can be used as a backup.

Once in service, Equiano will provide additional insurance to a region that badly needs it. After Togo, Equiano’s next stop will be Nigeria and Namibia, before heading to his final landing in Cape Town, South Africa. It should be fully operational later this year.

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Smart devices are spying on you – 2 IT experts explain how the Internet of Things can violate your privacy https://reservocation.com/smart-devices-are-spying-on-you-2-it-experts-explain-how-the-internet-of-things-can-violate-your-privacy/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 12:20:18 +0000 https://reservocation.com/smart-devices-are-spying-on-you-2-it-experts-explain-how-the-internet-of-things-can-violate-your-privacy/ Have you ever felt a creeping sensation that someone is watching you? Then you turn around and see nothing out of the ordinary. Depending on where you were, however, you might not have fully imagined it. There are billions of things that detect you every day. They’re everywhere, hidden in plain sight – inside your […]]]>

Have you ever felt a creeping sensation that someone is watching you? Then you turn around and see nothing out of the ordinary. Depending on where you were, however, you might not have fully imagined it. There are billions of things that detect you every day. They’re everywhere, hidden in plain sight – inside your TV, fridge, car and office. These things know more about you than you realize, and many of them communicate this information on the Internet.

In 2007, it would have been hard to imagine the revolution in useful apps and services that smartphones ushered in. But they came at a cost in terms of intrusion and loss of confidentiality. As computer scientists who study data management and privacy, we find that with Internet connectivity extended to devices in homes, offices, and cities, privacy is at greater risk than ever.

internet of things

Your appliances, car and home are designed to make your life easier and automate the tasks you do every day: turn lights on and off when you enter and leave a room, remind you when your tomatoes are about to spoil, customize the temperature of the house according to the weather and the preferences of each person in the household.

To do their magic, they need the internet to ask for help and correlate data. Without internet access, your smart thermostat can collect data about you, but it doesn’t know what the weather forecast is, and it’s not powerful enough to process all the information to decide what to do.

The Nest smart thermostat tracks your presence and is connected to the internet.
Advanced smart home/Flickr, CC BY

But it’s not just the things in your home that communicate on the Internet. Workplaces, malls, and cities are also getting smarter, and smart devices in those places have similar requirements. In fact, the Internet of Things (IoT) is already widely used in transportation and logistics, agriculture and farming, and industrial automation. There were around 22 billion internet-connected devices in use worldwide in 2018, and that number is expected to grow to over 50 billion by 2030.

What these things know about you

Smart devices collect a wide range of data about their users. Smart security cameras and smart assistants are, ultimately, cameras and microphones in your home that collect video and audio information about your presence and activities. At the less obvious end of the spectrum, things like smart TVs use cameras and microphones to spy on users, smart light bulbs track your sleep and heart rate, and smart vacuum cleaners recognize objects in and around your home. map every inch.

Sometimes this monitoring is marketed as a feature. For example, some Wi-Fi routers can collect location information from users in the home and even coordinate with other smart devices to detect movement.

Manufacturers usually promise that only automated decision-making systems and not humans see your data. But it’s not always the case. For example, Amazon employees listen to certain conversations with Alexa, transcribe and annotate them, before feeding them into automated decision-making systems.

But even limiting access to personal data to automated decision-making systems can have undesirable consequences. Any private data shared over the Internet could be vulnerable to hackers anywhere in the world, and few consumer Internet-connected devices are very secure.

Understand your vulnerabilities

With some devices, like smart speakers or cameras, users can sometimes turn them off for privacy reasons. However, even when it is an option, disconnecting devices from the internet can severely limit their usefulness. You also don’t have that option when you’re in workspaces, malls, or smart cities, so you might be vulnerable even if you don’t own smart devices.

Therefore, as a user, it is important to make an informed decision by understanding the trade-offs between privacy and convenience when purchasing, installing, and using an Internet-connected device. Its not always easy. Studies have shown that, for example, owners of smart home personal assistants have an incomplete understanding of what data the devices collect, where the data is stored, and who can access it.

a toddler touches the top of a black cylinder on a dining table while a family eats in the background
Smart speakers constantly listen to your commands.
Oscar Wong/Moment via Getty Images

Governments around the world have introduced laws to protect privacy and give people more control over their data. Some examples are the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Through this, for example, you can submit a data subject access request (DSAR) to the organization collecting your data from an internet-connected device. Organizations are required to respond to requests within these jurisdictions within one month explaining what data is collected, how it is used within the organization and whether it is shared with third parties.

Limit privacy breaches

Regulation is an important step; however, their app will likely take some time to catch up with the ever-increasing number of internet-connected devices. In the meantime, there are things you can do to take advantage of some of the benefits of connecting to the Internet without disclosing an excessive amount of personal data.

If you have a smart device, you can take steps to secure it and minimize the risk to your privacy. The Federal Trade Commission offers suggestions on how to secure your Internet-connected devices. Two key steps are to regularly update the device’s firmware, go through its settings, and turn off any data collection that isn’t related to what you want the device to do. The Online Trust Alliance provides additional advice and a checklist for consumers to ensure safe and private use of internet-connected consumer devices.

If you’re about to purchase an internet-connected device, learn about the data it captures and the manufacturer’s data management policies from independent sources such as Mozilla’s Privacy Not Included. Using this information, you can opt for a version of the smart device you want from a manufacturer that takes user privacy seriously.

[Over 150,000 readers rely on The Conversation’s newsletters to understand the world. Sign up today.]

Finally, you can pause and ask yourself if you really need all your devices to be smart. For example, are you willing to give information about yourself so that you can verbally command your coffee machine to make you coffee?

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The Digital Iron Curtain: How Russia’s Internet Could Soon Start to Look a Lot Like China’s https://reservocation.com/the-digital-iron-curtain-how-russias-internet-could-soon-start-to-look-a-lot-like-chinas/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 01:54:08 +0000 https://reservocation.com/the-digital-iron-curtain-how-russias-internet-could-soon-start-to-look-a-lot-like-chinas/ By Rishi Iyengar, CNN Business Like many other things in the country, the Russian Internet has long straddled East and West. Russian citizens, unlike their Chinese counterparts, were able to access US technology platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Google, despite being subject to censorship and restrictions – the defining feature of China’s internet model. […]]]>

By Rishi Iyengar, CNN Business

Like many other things in the country, the Russian Internet has long straddled East and West.

Russian citizens, unlike their Chinese counterparts, were able to access US technology platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Google, despite being subject to censorship and restrictions – the defining feature of China’s internet model.

But Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, which has been increasingly isolating the country in recent days, could also spell the end of its presence on the global web.

On Friday, as sanctions against Russia tightened and fighting in Ukraine continued to escalate, the Russian government said it had decided to block Facebook, citing steps taken by the social network in recent days to impose restrictions on Russian-controlled media.

Although Facebook is by no means the largest platform in the country, blocking it may be a symbolic measure to signal that President Vladimir Putin’s government is ready to go after big global names if they don’t toe the line. party. (Instagram and WhatsApp, which are more popular in Russia and also owned by Facebook’s parent company Meta, have not yet been blocked). Already, the country’s main telecommunications agency, Rozkomnadzor, is pressuring Google over what it calls “fake” news, and is also reportedly restricting Twitter. Other platforms choose to stop operations on their own.

Being cut off from Russia may not pose an existential threat to Western tech platforms, some of which have audiences in the billions. But these measures have major implications for the ability of Russians to access information and speak freely. At a more fundamental level, it could also further accelerate the fracture of the global internet as we know it.

A digital iron curtain

Many of Russia’s recent restrictions on Western tech platforms stem from a “sovereign internet” law Russia enacted in 2019 that allows Roskomnadzor to more tightly control internet access in the country and potentially sever its online ties with the rest of the world.

A law passed by Putin’s government on Friday further entrenches hostility towards Western services, making it a crime to spread ‘false’ information about the invasion of Ukraine, punishable by up to 15 years jail, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. The law prompted several outlets, including CNN, to suspend coverage from Russia. TikTok also cited the new legal environment when announcing its decision to prevent further downloads and livestreams on its platform in Russia.

Other tech companies have previously recalled their presence in Russia amid the Ukraine conflict. Apple, Microsoft and Intel have halted all sales and restricted services in the country, while Google, Twitter, Netflix, Spotify and Meta have blocked or restricted Russian state-run media and in some cases shut down altogether advertising in the country. Cogent Communications, one of the world’s largest internet traffic hosts, reportedly began cutting some Russian service providers from its network on Friday.

It’s a perfect storm that could lead to Russia finally isolating its population from the rest of the global internet, just like China has already done.

“The crisis is definitely a flashpoint, and likely a turning point, for Western platforms operating in Russia,” Jessica Brandt, director of policy for the Artificial Intelligence and Emerging Technologies Initiative at CNN Business, told CNN Business. the Brookings Institution. “Moscow will undoubtedly continue to pressure platforms to remove unflattering content, using all the levers at its disposal. If companies comply, public reactions elsewhere in the world will be intense,” she added.

The term used to refer to the two countries’ respective censorship apparatuses is also similar – where China has its Great Firewall, Russia has been dubbed a Digital Iron Curtain. But while there are many similarities between the two, there are also key differences that raise doubts about Russia’s ability to maintain its own self-sustaining digital ecosystem.

Can the Russian Internet survive without Western technology?

While China has spent decades building up its far-reaching censorship capabilities and has almost always blocked most Western tech platforms from operating in the country, Russia is trying to make that shift while waging war. Russia’s ability to deploy the same level of technology as China is questionable, whether it’s making Western platforms completely inaccessible or even censoring specific content and topics in real time, as does the Chinese government frequently.

“I think a nuanced difference between Russia and China is that China has the technical capability – their big firewall is very sophisticated and Russia doesn’t have that much,” said Xiaomeng Lu, director of the practical geotechnology for Eurasia. Group. “As much as they [Russia] I want to do a full and complete block, I think technically there are challenges.

Unlike China, millions of people in Russia have been accustomed to accessing global technology platforms, and cutting them off from these platforms altogether is something the Russian government under Putin has so far refrained from taking. But that is rapidly changing as the war and resulting Western sanctions continue to escalate.

“Closing it completely, I think, risks some sort of political backlash for the government,” Lu said. However, she adds, “that type of fear is losing out to the fear of regime survival. longer term”.

Russia’s reliance on outside technology has been highlighted as foreign companies sever ties in response to Western sanctions. Texas-based Saber and its European counterpart Amadeus kicked Russia’s biggest airline, Aeroflot, out of their global ticketing and reservations systems last week. The country’s central bank also announced that Apple Pay and Google Pay will no longer support cards from several Russian banks.

Russia has alternatives to global technology platforms such as the Yandex search engine and the VK social network, which have tens of millions of users. But Lu says it’s not “as vibrant an ecosystem as China”, which has several tech giants including Tencent, Alibaba and Weibo that rival their Silicon Valley counterparts.

Russian rigs also face their own collateral damage from the invasion of Ukraine and the resulting Western sanctions. Yandex warned last week that a crash in the stock market due to sanctions could prevent it from paying its debts, and Vladimir Kiriyenko, the CEO of VK’s parent company, is among those sanctioned by the US government. On Monday, Dutch investment firm Prosus announced it would cancel its investment in VK – worth around $700 million – and asked its directors on the company’s board to resign.

“It is the Russian people who will lose a lot”

While the Russian government seems more than ready to kick Western tech platforms from its digital borders, the same cannot be said for the Russian people.

“The Russian government has everything to gain from Big Tech’s exit,” Brandt said. “It is the Russian people who will lose enormously if they are denied access to non-governmental news and information and denied the means to organize themselves.”

There are already signs that Russians are looking for ways to evade internet blockages. Five of the top 10 downloaded apps in the country last week were virtual private network (VPN) apps that allow users to create a more secure internet connection. Downloads of the most popular VPN apps during this period collectively increased by more than 1,300%, according to app tracking platform Sensor Tower.

Somehow, the digital iron curtain seems to be falling.

Lu admits it’s hard to predict exactly how quickly a complete separation of Russia’s internet from the world will take place, but recent developments indicate it could happen in “weeks or maybe even days.”

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia company. All rights reserved.

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Elon Musk activates free SpaceX Starlink satellite internet service in Ukraine https://reservocation.com/elon-musk-activates-free-spacex-starlink-satellite-internet-service-in-ukraine/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 21:39:00 +0000 https://reservocation.com/elon-musk-activates-free-spacex-starlink-satellite-internet-service-in-ukraine/ SpaceX founder and billionaire Elon Musk is providing free satellite internet service in Ukraine through his company Starlink, as Russia invades the country and causes blackouts. Starlink is a growing network of small satellites that SpaceX has been built since 2018 to provide high-speed Internet access worldwide. On Monday, Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister […]]]>

SpaceX founder and billionaire Elon Musk is providing free satellite internet service in Ukraine through his company Starlink, as Russia invades the country and causes blackouts.

Starlink is a growing network of small satellites that SpaceX has been built since 2018 to provide high-speed Internet access worldwide. On Monday, Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Digital Transformation Mykhailo Fedorov, tweeted that a truck full of Starlink terminals had arrived on Ukrainian soil, after he had requested them.

Fedorov had appealed to Musk in a Tweeter On Saturday, asking him to extend Starlink’s high-speed broadband internet services to the beleaguered country, noting rhetorically that “while you’re trying to colonize Mars – Russia is trying to occupy Ukraine! As your rockets land successfully from space – Russian rockets attack Ukrainian civilians!”

Musk apparently agreed, tweeting on Saturday that Starlink service was active in Ukraine and also agreeing to send more Starlink terminals to expand the country’s bandwidth.

“Starlink service is now active in Ukraine. More terminals on the way,” Musk said. tweeted.

Invading Russian troops disrupted Ukraine’s internet infrastructure, rendering service unreliable and spotty in some parts of the country.

Starlink service, which its website describes as “ideal for rural and remote communities” and other places where internet connections have historically been unavailable, is expected to be more reliable than terrestrial systems that are currently down.

A Starlink terminal costs $499. The system was recently used to restore communications to remote villages in Tonga after a volcanic eruption triggered a tsunamicutting off internet service.

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Live Updates: Musk’s Starlink Internet ‘Active’ in Ukraine https://reservocation.com/live-updates-musks-starlink-internet-active-in-ukraine/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 05:41:42 +0000 https://reservocation.com/live-updates-musks-starlink-internet-active-in-ukraine/ The latest on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine: LOS ANGELES — Elon Musk says his company SpaceX’s Starlink satellite internet service is now “active” in Ukraine. The tech billionaire made the announcement on Twitter in response to a tweet from Ukraine’s digital transformation minister saying that while Musk is trying to “colonize Mars”, Russia is trying […]]]>

The latest on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine:

LOS ANGELES — Elon Musk says his company SpaceX’s Starlink satellite internet service is now “active” in Ukraine.

The tech billionaire made the announcement on Twitter in response to a tweet from Ukraine’s digital transformation minister saying that while Musk is trying to “colonize Mars”, Russia is trying to occupy Ukraine. The minister called on Musk to equip his country with Starlink stations.

In his response on Saturday, Musk said, “Starlink service is now active in Ukraine. More terminals on the way.”

Starlink is a satellite internet system that SpaceX has been building for years to bring internet access to underserved areas of the world. It bills itself as “ideally suited” for areas where internet service is unreliable or unavailable.

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UNITED NATIONS – The International Committee of the Red Cross says it is aware of requests by Ukraine’s UN ambassador and others to repatriate the bodies of Russian soldiers killed in action in Ukraine, but no there are no numbers.

Ambassador Sergiy Kyslytsya tweeted on Saturday that Ukraine had called on the ICRC “to facilitate the repatriation of the thousands of bodies of Russian soldiers” killed during its invasion of Ukraine. An accompanying chart indicated that 3,500 Russian soldiers had been killed.

Kyslytsya tweeted that relatives in Russia should be given a chance “to bury them with dignity”. “Don’t let (Russian President Vladimir) Putin hide the scale of the tragedy,” he urged.

Laetitia Courtois, the ICRC’s permanent observer to the United Nations, told The Associated Press on Saturday evening that the current security situation “is a major concern and a limitation for our teams on the ground” and “we therefore cannot confirm the figures or other details”.

She said “the ICRC can act as a neutral intermediary” on the restitution of bodies and other humanitarian issues in times of conflict, including clarifying the fate of missing persons, reuniting families and advocating for the protection of detainees “as far as possible”.

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KYIV, Ukraine — The Ukrainian president’s office said Russian forces blew up a gas pipeline in Kharkiv, the country’s second-largest city.

The state Communications and Information Special Protection Service warned that the blast, which it said resembled a mushroom cloud, could cause an “environmental disaster” and advised residents to cover their windows with a damp cloth or gauze and drink plenty of fluids.

Ukraine’s chief prosecutor Iryna Venediktova said Russian forces were unable to take Kharkiv, where a fierce battle was underway.

The city of 1.5 million people is located 40 kilometers (25 miles) from the Russian border.

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GENEVA – The United Nations says it has confirmed at least 240 civilian casualties, including at least 64 people killed, in fighting in Ukraine that has erupted since Russia invaded on Thursday – although it believes the “actual numbers are considerably higher. high” because many reports of the casualties remain to be confirmed.

The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs of the United Nations relayed on Saturday evening the count of the office of human rights of the United Nations, which has strict methodologies and procedures for verifying the toll of conflicts.

OCHA also said damage to civilian infrastructure had deprived hundreds of thousands of people of access to electricity or water, and produced a map of “humanitarian situations” in Ukraine – mainly in the north, l eastern and southern Ukraine.

The human rights office had reported on Friday morning a first count by its staff of at least 127 civilian victims – 25 people killed and 102 injured – mainly as a result of bombardments and air strikes.

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PARIS — French President Emmanuel Macron has asked his Belarusian counterpart to demand that the country, a neighbor of Ukraine, quickly order the departure of Russian troops.

In a phone conversation on Saturday, Macron denounced “the seriousness of a decision that would allow Russia to deploy nuclear weapons on Belarusian soil,” a statement from the presidential palace said.

Macron told Alexander Lukashenko that the brotherhood between the Belarusian and Ukrainian peoples should lead Belarus to “refuse to be a vassal and an accomplice of Russia in the war against Ukraine,” the statement said.

Belarus was one of several axes used by Russia to launch attacks on Ukraine, with Belarus poised to move to the capital Kiev, a senior US defense official said.

Macron has been persistent in trying to broker a ceasefire amid the war, using the phone to talk to all sides, diplomacy and European Union sanctions.

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MOSCOW — Russia is closing its airspace to planes from Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and Slovenia, a move that comes as Moscow’s ties with the West plunge to new lows following its invasion of Ukraine .

Russia’s state aviation agency, Rosaviatsia, announced early Sunday that the action was taken in retaliation for the four nations closing their airspace to Russian planes.

On Saturday, the agency also reported the closure of Russian airspace to planes from Romania, Bulgaria, Poland and the Czech Republic in response to their action.

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WASHINGTON — The United States, the European Union and the United Kingdom agreed on Saturday to block “selected” Russian banks from the global financial messaging system SWIFT and to impose “restrictive measures” on its central bank in retaliation for his invasion of Ukraine.

The measures were jointly announced as part of a new round of financial sanctions intended to exact a heavy toll on Russia for the invasion.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said she would also push the bloc to “cripple the assets of the Central Bank of Russia” so that its transactions are frozen.

Cutting several commercial banks from SWIFT “will ensure that these banks are disconnected from the international financial system and will harm their ability to operate globally”, she said.

As a third measure, she said the EU would “commit to taking action to limit the sale of citizenship – the so-called golden passports – which allow wealthy Russians linked to the Russian government to become citizens of our countries and ‘access our financial systems’.

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COPENHAGEN – Danish newspaper Ekstra Bladet says two freelancers working for the paper were injured when the car they were traveling in was hit by gunfire near the village of Ohtyrka in eastern Ukraine.

The journalist and photographer were taken to a local hospital, Ekstra Bladet said, adding that their injuries were not life-threatening. The newspaper was working with a security company to evacuate the two journalists.

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Follow AP coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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Ohio database highlights 454 use-of-force incidents in Stark County https://reservocation.com/ohio-database-highlights-454-use-of-force-incidents-in-stark-county/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 10:39:14 +0000 https://reservocation.com/ohio-database-highlights-454-use-of-force-incidents-in-stark-county/ How often do law enforcement officers shoot a weapon on the job or use another type of force in the performance of their duties? The state keeps track of these statistics, but not all police departments participate. Six of Stark County’s 23 law enforcement agencies voluntarily reported more than 100 incidents in which officers used […]]]>

How often do law enforcement officers shoot a weapon on the job or use another type of force in the performance of their duties? The state keeps track of these statistics, but not all police departments participate.

Six of Stark County’s 23 law enforcement agencies voluntarily reported more than 100 incidents in which officers used force on the job last year.

Most of those incidents occurred in Canton, which has one of the largest police departments in the county. Canal Fulton, Louisville and Uniontown police departments weighed in.

But not all departments are included as participation is voluntary.

Continued:Body camera footage: The officer shoots before shouting, “Police! Get down now!”

Continued:Canton releases unredacted report on fatal police shooting

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Lumbee Tribal Council Allows Internet Service Providers on Tribal Lands https://reservocation.com/lumbee-tribal-council-allows-internet-service-providers-on-tribal-lands/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 01:35:30 +0000 https://reservocation.com/lumbee-tribal-council-allows-internet-service-providers-on-tribal-lands/ PEMBROKE — The Lumbee Tribal Council on Thursday gave the green light to two internet service providers to provide high-speed service along tribal lands. Council unanimously approved a resolution of consent and support for the Atlantic Telephone Membership Corporation (Focus Broadband) and Charter Communications (Spectrum) to build and provide high-speed Internet access in areas designated […]]]>

PEMBROKE — The Lumbee Tribal Council on Thursday gave the green light to two internet service providers to provide high-speed service along tribal lands.

Council unanimously approved a resolution of consent and support for the Atlantic Telephone Membership Corporation (Focus Broadband) and Charter Communications (Spectrum) to build and provide high-speed Internet access in areas designated as Tribal Territory Lands Lumbee through Robeson, Hoke, Scotland and Cumberland. counties.

The council also approved the construction of a network for the proliferation of high-speed internet service in the public right-of-way of Lumbee lands and offered support to the two providers to obtain subsidies to achieve the goal.

“A significant number of homes and businesses currently do not have access to fast and reliable high-speed internet…this lack of high-speed internet access has placed our tribe at a significant disadvantage, and in particular our students and children. “, read Gerald. Goolsby, chairman of the Economic Development Committee, orders.

Councilor Richard Jones told council members that this is good news for the Lumbee Tribe.

“It should set a precedent for any company that wants to do business with the Lumbee Tribe, with the Lumbee Tribe, which would create land recognition. I think it’s really a happy day for the tribe,” Jones said.

In financial matters, the board approved the first amendment to the current year’s budget to include more than $5 million in funds remaining from the prior year’s budget. The funds will be used to augment the Housing Replacement, Property Maintenance, Dreamcatcher Communities and Vehicle Maintenance line items of the current fiscal year 2021-22 budget, said Pam Hunt, Chair of the Lumbee Finance Committee. TribalCouncil.

The biggest increase will be the Dream Catcher item. An additional $3,693,452.83 will be budgeted, bringing the new total to $4,866,298.83.

An additional $180,000 was added to the house replacement element, bringing the new total to $680,000; $600,000 was added to homeownership maintenance, bringing the new total to $1,125,000; and the vehicle maintenance budget has been doubled and now totals $100,000.

Report and ethical decisions

No sanctions will be imposed on three complaints filed with the ethics committee, Dewey McNeill, chair of the committee, said in a report.

A lawsuit was filed against Joshua Malcolm, who was a Lumbee Tribe Supreme Court Justice, by Ron Oxendine. McNeill said the case was thrown out because the council lacked the power to go to the tribe’s supreme court.

Two complaints about a conflict of interest involving council members Marshirl Lockler and Wendy Moore were also dismissed. Locklear’s dismal complaint came after a review determined there was no conflict. Moore’s case was dismissed because she requested the recusal on the case via email before the case was discussed.

Community Feedback

During the community feedback portion of the meeting, former Lumbee Tribal Council Chair Anita Blanks called on council members to create an order requiring answers from the Lumbee Tribe Supreme Court.

“I’d like to know when you’re all going to set parameters for our Supreme Court in terms of hearing cases,” Blanks said. “If they don’t respond to the complainant, let them (those filing the complaint) know that they won’t hear it and why they won’t. This kind of things.

Blanks said she personally submitted several cases to the Supreme Court that received no response.

“No we’re not gonna hear it, we’re not gonna hear it, kiss my foot, nothing and I’ve acquired multiple times,” Blanks said. “Currently they just don’t hear, don’t respond to cases.”

Blanks said when she was on the board, an ordinance was proposed to address the issue.

“It unfortunately didn’t come out of the committee, but I hope you all do better than us.”

Tomeka Sinclair can be reached at [email protected] or 910-416-5865.

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Katy ISD’s LGBTQ Students Call Internet Policy Discriminatory, Demand Change https://reservocation.com/katy-isds-lgbtq-students-call-internet-policy-discriminatory-demand-change/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 04:23:43 +0000 https://reservocation.com/katy-isds-lgbtq-students-call-internet-policy-discriminatory-demand-change/ [ad_1] KATY – Several students who spoke at Katy ISD’s board meeting on Monday said they would not be silenced as long as what they see as “LGBTQ discrimination through internet policies Will not be terminated. School district administrators said the policy in place is to protect all students. “Definitely discriminatory,” said Cameron Samuels, a […]]]>


[ad_1]

KATY – Several students who spoke at Katy ISD’s board meeting on Monday said they would not be silenced as long as what they see as “LGBTQ discrimination through internet policies Will not be terminated.

School district administrators said the policy in place is to protect all students.

“Definitely discriminatory,” said Cameron Samuels, a final year student at Seven Lakes High School.

Samuels refers to the Katy ISD Internet Policy which school district administrators say is aligned with the Children’s Internet Protection Act or CIPA.

The policy blocks access to websites based on content deemed inappropriate, but Samuels says it also filters critical access to LGBTQ resources.

“When a student is on the verge of suicide, it is imperative that they have access to a lifeline like the Trevor Project,” Samuels said.

He said that when Katy ISD students tried to use the school internet to access Project Trevor and other sites aimed at the LGBTQ community, they received a rejection message instead.

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Katy ISD officials released the following statement in response to the outrage:

“The district provides a variety of communications and technology resources that are consistent with its educational goals and compliant with the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA). As there are billions of websites hosted on the World Wide Web, the content made available to students during the teaching day is reviewed and filtered by a third-party academic platform that ensures compliance with CIPA. The filtering process takes into account all material that can be found on a website, including hyperlinks to external content such as email, discussion forums and other forms of direct electronic communication – spaces that are often occupied. by minors and adults, and not recommended by CIPA. Guidelines for the responsible use of technology for students in the district can be found here.

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Katy ISD did not say she is blocking access to websites just because they focus on LGBTQ issues, but rather on content involving “human sexuality,” as seen in a post apparently limiting access. at the Human Rights Campaign website.

Samuels is convinced that the current policy in place sends a strong message in the wrong direction.

“That they are not, they are not seen for what they are,” Samuel said.

In addition to a petition with over a thousand signatures, the students submitted a formal request to the technology department, hoping that exceptions would be made to Internet policy. It is not yet clear if and when this will happen.

Copyright 2021 by KPRC Click2Houston – All rights reserved.

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Life without a reliable internet remains a daily struggle for millions of Americans https://reservocation.com/life-without-a-reliable-internet-remains-a-daily-struggle-for-millions-of-americans/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 11:00:36 +0000 https://reservocation.com/life-without-a-reliable-internet-remains-a-daily-struggle-for-millions-of-americans/ [ad_1] Three days and an hour after the start of the 2021-22 school year, the internet shut down at the Owhyhee Combined School in northern Nevada. Teachers rushed to recreate their lesson plans and presentations, and were unable to register attendance. “We have no way of ensuring that students are in the right classes at […]]]>


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Three days and an hour after the start of the 2021-22 school year, the internet shut down at the Owhyhee Combined School in northern Nevada.

Teachers rushed to recreate their lesson plans and presentations, and were unable to register attendance.

“We have no way of ensuring that students are in the right classes at the right time,” said Lynn Manning-John, vice principal of K-12 school.

“We had a student showing symptoms of COVID this morning, so finding this student’s data in order to reach his family is also something we can’t do because we don’t have the internet.”

The face-to-face classes had just resumed after a year of mainly distance learning. But for Owyhee’s students, instructors, and administrators, this was not an entirely new problem. The community has never had reliable high speed internet access.

Before the pandemic, they could just wait for connectivity to return, Manning-John said. But school materials and systems have been moved online to enable distance learning. And internet problems also affected the last year of online school – many students were unable to log into their classes from home.

The town of Owyhee is about 100 miles from the nearest towns with services, requiring a 1.5 hour road trip to do groceries, for example. It is located on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation, home to the Shoshone-Paiute tribes, in northern Nevada and southern Idaho.

Manning-John said their remote location has made it difficult for them to get online for years.

“We want fiber, we want 5G, we want the latest technology, but we’re so isolated, it’s a challenge for [telecommunications companies] to get their employees to come here, ”she said.

The reservation has only one cell phone tower and one wired Internet provider, according to Mary Howard, the reservation’s computer systems administrator. But that internet connection is slow and unreliable, and Manning-John said it doesn’t even reach his house. She and her five children use their phone’s hotspots to connect to the Internet at home.

This has made working and studying from home a challenge over the past year and a half. Other Owyhee students faced an even greater challenge, Manning-John said.

“[My kids], their mom works at school. Their mother can afford the Internet. Their mother could afford to have a phone with personal hotspot service included in our plan, “she said.” We are the exception.

Broadband and the digital divide

The pandemic has laid bare the importance of having a high-speed internet connection, as many Americans have been forced to live their lives online. Yet tens of millions of people across the country, especially in rural areas and tribal lands, lack the kind of fast or reliable connection they need for things like work, school and telehealth.

President Biden’s recently signed $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill aims to alleviate the problem by setting aside $ 65 billion for broadband investments. Its largest allocations would give states $ 42.5 billion to fund broadband infrastructure, as well as $ 14.25 billion in subsidies to help low-income households access the Internet.

Lawmakers consulted with Kathryn de Wit, project manager for the Pew Charitable Trusts Broadband Access Initiative, and her team when drafting the legislation. She said the plan was a “big down payment” for connecting underserved households – in part because it also relied on the Federal Communications Commission to better determine exactly who did not have high-speed Internet access.

The FCC estimated that 14.5 million people in the United States lived in areas without broadband access at the end of 2019, while data aggregation company BroadbandNow estimated that number at 42 million. The White House says 30 million.

In 2020, separate legislation asked the FCC to update its broadband access cards. Tired of waiting for these updates, some states already have deployed their own methods to track broadband access. The new legislation requires the FCC to complete its map updates by making funding conditional on the submission of those updates – and also stipulates a process by which states can dispute the FCC maps with their own.

Then there are questions about what really constitutes high internet speeds. The FCC defines broadband as an Internet connection with minimum speeds of 25 megabits per second for download and 3 Mbps for download. De Wit notes that these minimum speeds may be insufficient for the level of demand observed during the pandemic.

“What is it [means] is that a person in the household can access the internet, make purchases, just surf the web, send emails with limited interference, ”said de Wit.“ As soon as you have more users who are on this connection, which perform more complex tasks such as, for example, , connect with doctors, talk or participate in education, the quality of that connection will deteriorate, ”she said.

De Wit further points out that the FCC’s tally is based on the number of households that have access to a broadband connection with the maximum speeds. announcement by providers – not the actual speeds they receive.

The infrastructure bill would not change the 25/3 definition of broadband, but would require grant recipients to provide a minimum service of 100 Mbps download and 20 Mbps download.

What is clear even with uneven data available is that most of the people without broadband access live in rural, remote, low-income and tribal lands. Low population density and geographic barriers may discourage a service provider from offering services in this region.

“It’s important to remember that we are talking about a for-profit industry,” said de Wit. “So when we look at communities that are not densely populated, perhaps where income levels are lower, where providers don’t see a clear business case, then it is up to the public sector to identify the opportunities to encourage investment in these communities. “

In places where broadband is available, some households may not be able to afford the services. A Pew Inquiry conducted earlier this year found that 45% of respondents who did not have broadband cited the monthly cost as a reason for not having it.

De Wit said the new FCC data would not only help understand where broadband access is needed most, but also illustrate where there may be a connection available, but not affordable.

“The digital divide is really complicated, and so where we would like to see additional support is for state and local leaders to collect the data they need to illustrate the number of unserved households in communities. which are ‘served’ on the federal database, ”she said.

Waiting for a solution in the Duck Valley

The infrastructure bill establishes $ 2 billion in funding specifically for tribal communities – Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Hawaiian Natives. This gives Manning-John reassurance that the tribal areas will not be fighting against states and municipalities for federal money.

In the meantime, she only updates her phone when she’s staying in an out-of-town hotel and can connect to Wi-Fi for a few hours. She sees parents parking near the school to connect to the internet when the school switches to online learning to limit the spread of the virus. She sees her Grade 11 daughter taking online classes powered by a cellphone hotspot – and she longs for a day without so many connection issues.

Next, she looks at the land in the Duck Valley Reservation and remembers why she chose to stay.

“We need to remember, once again, as we go through some of the 21st century’s most Internet-less problems, that our ancestors put us in the right place so that when it all stops, we still have our beautiful land and everything we need to survive, ”she said.

Still, she acknowledges that surviving the modern era – especially during a pandemic – is nearly impossible on the reserve without high-speed internet.

“Our isolation has historically allowed us to preserve our language, our culture and our traditions, and that has served us well,” she said. “However, this is of no use to us in the age of the Internet where we need up-to-date, late-breaking information; we need to be able to disseminate information and instructions.”

This story is part of our All things Considered series on the President’s recently signed infrastructure bill. Alejandra Marquez Janse and Amy Isackson produced this story for broadcast. Patrick Jarenwattananon contributed to its adaptation to the web.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Competition with Starlink: Stratosphere pilots should bring internet access https://reservocation.com/competition-with-starlink-stratosphere-pilots-should-bring-internet-access/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 20:20:40 +0000 https://reservocation.com/competition-with-starlink-stratosphere-pilots-should-bring-internet-access/ [ad_1] Mobile balloon or plane stations in the stratosphere have so far been an unrealized dream. It wasn’t until the beginning of the year that Internet giant Alphabet ended its Moonshot Loon project due to a lack of profit prospects, which wanted to bring the Internet to the poor masses in developing countries. with balloons […]]]>


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Mobile balloon or plane stations in the stratosphere have so far been an unrealized dream. It wasn’t until the beginning of the year that Internet giant Alphabet ended its Moonshot Loon project due to a lack of profit prospects, which wanted to bring the Internet to the poor masses in developing countries. with balloons in arrow. However, the global consortium for this “High Altitude Platform Station” (HAPS), to which Airbus and Deutsche Telekom also belong, do not give up: the first summit of the HAPS alliance took place on Monday to give more impetus to the idea that was coming down.

Airborne commercial services for the internet could take off in 2027, said Ryuji Wakikawa, vice president of Japanese mobile operator Softbank Corp. Global technology investor Softbank’s Japanese mobile network is sticking to the idea and just acquired Loon’s patents. Wakikawa was therefore optimistic: “The challenge is not technology, but national rules and market acceptance.

Japan has always tried everything possible with electronics Рand often the impossible. Every Thursday, our author Martin K̦lling reports here the latest trends from Tokyo.

  • More articles on “Japan Post”

For Wakikawa, the global telecommunications industry is facing a paradigm shift. The network’s strategy is shifting “from covering as much of the population as possible to the entire territory,” explained the Softbanks employee for in-house HAPS Mobile. And its raison d’être is the “Internet of Things”.

The new 5G networks will not only connect more people, but also machines, measuring stations and sensors, argued Wakikawa – and this also in remote areas that were previously not covered due to a lack of people. For this reason, various companies have been competing for years with ideas to allow Internet access without land base stations in all corners of the world.

The HAPS alliance is one of the comrades in arms. Suppliers want solar-powered balloons, airships or light planes with a large wingspan to rise 20 kilometers high into the stratosphere, where flying base stations can spin for months. However, the idea is in competition with satellite Internet, which enjoys significant support.

None other than Tesla founder Elon Musk and his space company SpaceX are already distributing satellites for his Starlink project in near-Earth orbits. Not before October Musk tweetedthat customers would not have to do without high-speed internet services on planes via its full network. Softbank is also banking on base stations in space with an investment in the start-up OneWeb.

But for Wakikawa, HAPS remains an alternative to expensive satellite Internet. Aspects are the lower start-up costs for stratosphere pilots, another is the lower delay in data transfer. With satellites, the so-called latency is 20 to 500 milliseconds, with a HAPS network only 0.3 milliseconds, he announces. He also argues that satellite and stratospheric Internet should not be seen as competition, but as two technologies that complement each other.

More from MIT Technology Review

More from MIT Technology Review

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But despite all the enthusiasm, the digital conference also showed that until now a viable business model for the HAPS network was missing. The costs are still too high to fulfill the social mission of giving access to the Internet to the poorest in the most remote regions of the world.

An important requirement of the online conference was therefore the complete automation of the floating base stations. “We need an autonomous fleet management system,” said Andy Thurling, chair of the HAPS Alliance Aviation Working Group. But he’s also confident. The task force spent 2020 defining its goal. “Now we are in the operating mode. “


(jle)

Disclaimer: This article is generated from the feed and not edited by our team.


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