Nurses raise $1.5 million by offering fake COVID vaccine cards: district attorney

Two nurses from Long Island, New York, have been charged with falsifying vaccine cards, in a scheme that has grossed around $1.5 million, according to law enforcement officials.

The Suffolk County Police Department announced on Friday that nurses Julie DeVuono, 49, and Marissa Urraro, 44, were arrested for “falsifying COVID-19 vaccination records and entering false information in the New York State Immunization Information System (“NYSIIS”). ) to indicate that a vaccine has been administered.”

Police said they “charged $220 for adults and $85 for children per false entry.”

“As nurses, these two people need to understand the importance of legitimate vaccination cards as we all work together to protect the public health,” Suffolk County Police Commissioner Rodney K. Harrison said in a statement. a statement. published on facebook.

According to the Long Island Journal press dayprosecutors said when law enforcement officials searched DeVuono’s home, they found $900,000 in cash and a ledger showing profits of more than $1.5 million from the scheme presumed.

DeVuono is a nurse practitioner and owner of Wild Child Pediatric Healthcare, based in Amityville, New York, and Urraro is her employee, a licensed practical nurse, the newspaper reported.

“These individuals allegedly used their positions as licensed medical professionals to engage in criminal acts for their financial benefit,” Suffolk County District Attorney Ray Tierney said in a statement, according to press day.

“I hope this sends a message to others who are considering playing the system that they will get caught and that we will enforce the law to the fullest extent possible,” Tierney added.

Two nurses from Long Island, New York, have been charged with falsifying vaccine cards, in a scheme that has grossed around $1.5 million, according to law enforcement officials. Above, a nurse fills out a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) vaccination record at an LA Care Health Plan vaccination clinic at Los Angeles Mission College in the Sylmar neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, on January 19.
Robyn Beck

Police said DeVuono and Urraro were each charged with one count of second-degree forgery, and that DeVuono faces an additional first-degree count offering a false instrument for deposition.

Newsweek contacted the Suffolk County prosecutor’s office for details of the case, but did not receive a response in time for publication Saturday morning.

In a separate case in August, 13 people in New York who worked in “essential employee cadre” were charged with purchasing fake vaccine cards. Two people were also charged with selling the fake cards.

Jasmine Clifford, 31, allegedly sold about 250 fake COVID-19 vaccine cards on Instagram, according to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr.

“In a typical transaction, Clifford charged $200 for the forged cards and accepted payment via CashApp or Zelle,” said a press release from Vance’s office.

Another woman was accused of incorrectly entering names into the New York State Immunization Information System.

The 13 people charged with buying the cards worked in hospitals, medical and nursing schools and nursing homes, prosecutors said in August.

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